Dr Aditya Khanna

Lecturer

School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering
Faculty of Engineering, Architecture and Information Technology
aditya.khanna@uq.edu.au
+61 7 336 54264

Overview

Dr Aditya Khanna is a Lecturer (Applied Mechanics) at The University of Queensland (commenced 2023). Prior to joining UQ, Aditya worked as an engineering consultant (dynamics and vibration) at Vipac Engineers & Scientists Ltd and held an adjunct lecturer appointment at The University of Adelaide. Aditya's research and industry consulting background is in the areas of: stress analysis, fatigue and fracture assessment, structural dynamics, vibration control, and non-destructive testing,

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy of Mechanical Engineering
  • Bachelor (Honours) of Mechanical Engineering, University of Adelaide

Publications

View all Publications

Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy

View all Supervision

Available Projects

  • Wind turbines, though designed to harvest wind energy, are also subjected to complex aerodynamic loads during operation. Studying the fluid-structure coupling, especially dynamic instabilities, remains one of the most important structural engineering issues for the wind energy industry. With an exponential growth in wind energy production, it is critical to continue improving the safety and availability of wind turbines, while avoiding unnecessary conservatism in their design.

    Passive vibration control techniques, such as Tuned Mass Dampers (TMDs), are extensively utilised for controlling wind-induced vibration (and the resulting cyclic stresses) in tall structures. Distributed TMDs are a promising candidate for the suppression of multi-modal and multi-directional wind excitation within the tight space constraints of the wind turbine structure. This PhD project will develop theoretical and computational models of wind turbines with distributed TMDs as the means for passive vibration control. Methods for the efficient prediction of wind turbine tower aeroelastic excitations will be developed.

    The project will perform the fundamental task of quantifying second-order aerodynamic effects that are currently ignored in design codes, while also developing a predictive modelling technique that is computationally efficient. Aerodynamic loads resulting from blade rotation, crosswinds, and, vortex shedding, are not considered in most dynamic models of wind turbines. In this PhD project, these complex aerodynamic loads will be quantified (experimentally and numerically) and coupled with lumped-parameter and finite-element models of the turbine.

  • The project aims to develop a new methodology for fatigue life prediction in nominally defect-free structural components under realistic loading conditions. The methodology is based on recent experimental advances, which have improved the sensitivity of standardised testing techniques by orders of magnitude. The expected outcome of this project is a cycle-by-cycle investigation of the effective crack driving force for physically small cracks subjected to a large number (> 1 million) of loading cycles, making the study the first of its kind. This should advance research capabilities in structural life prognosis and benefit Australia’s strategic interest in the defence and infrastructure industries.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Journal Article

Conference Publication

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

    Other advisors:

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • Wind turbines, though designed to harvest wind energy, are also subjected to complex aerodynamic loads during operation. Studying the fluid-structure coupling, especially dynamic instabilities, remains one of the most important structural engineering issues for the wind energy industry. With an exponential growth in wind energy production, it is critical to continue improving the safety and availability of wind turbines, while avoiding unnecessary conservatism in their design.

    Passive vibration control techniques, such as Tuned Mass Dampers (TMDs), are extensively utilised for controlling wind-induced vibration (and the resulting cyclic stresses) in tall structures. Distributed TMDs are a promising candidate for the suppression of multi-modal and multi-directional wind excitation within the tight space constraints of the wind turbine structure. This PhD project will develop theoretical and computational models of wind turbines with distributed TMDs as the means for passive vibration control. Methods for the efficient prediction of wind turbine tower aeroelastic excitations will be developed.

    The project will perform the fundamental task of quantifying second-order aerodynamic effects that are currently ignored in design codes, while also developing a predictive modelling technique that is computationally efficient. Aerodynamic loads resulting from blade rotation, crosswinds, and, vortex shedding, are not considered in most dynamic models of wind turbines. In this PhD project, these complex aerodynamic loads will be quantified (experimentally and numerically) and coupled with lumped-parameter and finite-element models of the turbine.

  • The project aims to develop a new methodology for fatigue life prediction in nominally defect-free structural components under realistic loading conditions. The methodology is based on recent experimental advances, which have improved the sensitivity of standardised testing techniques by orders of magnitude. The expected outcome of this project is a cycle-by-cycle investigation of the effective crack driving force for physically small cracks subjected to a large number (> 1 million) of loading cycles, making the study the first of its kind. This should advance research capabilities in structural life prognosis and benefit Australia’s strategic interest in the defence and infrastructure industries.