Professor Stefan Thor

Professor in Developmental Biology

School of Biomedical Sciences
Faculty of Medicine
s.thor@uq.edu.au
+61 7 336 52684

Overview

BSc in Biology (1988) Umea University, Sweden

PhD in Molecular Biology (1994), Umea University, Sweden. Supervisor: Thomas Edlund

Postdoc, Molecular Neurobiology (1994-1999) Salk Institute, La Jolla, USA. Mentor: John B. Thomas

Assistant Professor (1999-2004), Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA

Professor of Developmental Biology (2004-2019), Linkoping University, Sweden

Professor of Developmental Biology (2019-), University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia

Member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences (2013-)

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, Ume� University

Publications

View all Publications

Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy

  • Doctor Philosophy

  • Doctor Philosophy

View all Supervision

Available Projects

  • The hypothalamic neuropeptide Npvf is expressed by a very small subset of neurons within the hypothalamus. Npvf has been implicated in fertility, seasonal mating behaviour and sleep-wake behaviours, in several different mammalian species, as well as in the zebrafish. But these studies have been based upon correlative experiments, RNAi and peptide injections, and the Npvf gene has hitherto not beek knocked out. we have geneerated a condititional null allele of Npvf. This project aims to address the effect of a null mutation in Npvf upon a set of mouse behaviours.

  • The hypothalamic neuropeptide Npvf is expressed by a very small subset of neurons within the hypothalamus. Npvf has been implicated in fertility, seasonal mating behaviour and sleep-wake behaviours. Using single cell transcriptional profiling, we and others have identified the transcription factors Tead1 and Vgll2 as selectively expressed in Npvf neurons in the mouse hypothalamus. The Tead and Vgll families typically interact and form a complex. We have generated a mouse Tead1 knock-out, and found that the Npvf neurons are missing. The project aims to address the underlying reason for the phenotype. We are also in the process of obtaining the mouse Vgll2 knockout, to be able to compare the effects of this knock-out with that of Tead1.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Book Chapter

Journal Article

Conference Publication

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • The hypothalamic neuropeptide Npvf is expressed by a very small subset of neurons within the hypothalamus. Npvf has been implicated in fertility, seasonal mating behaviour and sleep-wake behaviours, in several different mammalian species, as well as in the zebrafish. But these studies have been based upon correlative experiments, RNAi and peptide injections, and the Npvf gene has hitherto not beek knocked out. we have geneerated a condititional null allele of Npvf. This project aims to address the effect of a null mutation in Npvf upon a set of mouse behaviours.

  • The hypothalamic neuropeptide Npvf is expressed by a very small subset of neurons within the hypothalamus. Npvf has been implicated in fertility, seasonal mating behaviour and sleep-wake behaviours. Using single cell transcriptional profiling, we and others have identified the transcription factors Tead1 and Vgll2 as selectively expressed in Npvf neurons in the mouse hypothalamus. The Tead and Vgll families typically interact and form a complex. We have generated a mouse Tead1 knock-out, and found that the Npvf neurons are missing. The project aims to address the underlying reason for the phenotype. We are also in the process of obtaining the mouse Vgll2 knockout, to be able to compare the effects of this knock-out with that of Tead1.