Associate Professor Asaduzzaman Khan

Assoc Professor in Biostatistics

School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences
Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences
a.khan2@uq.edu.au
+61 7 334 67456

Overview

Asad has been with the University of Queensland since 2006. Prior to this, he has held academic appointments in biostatistics at the University of Sydney and the University of Dhaka. His current research focuses on the epidemiology of physical activity, sedentary behaviour, and their inter-relationships with health and wellbeing. He has a special interest in examining how/whether physical activity can attenuate or even eliminate the detrimental effects of sedentary behaviour on health and psychosocial wellbeing of children and adolescents. He is also interested in understanding the health and wellbeing of people from Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) backgrounds including immigrants, and identifying factors associated with health gaps in order to minimise inequalities and facilitate integration. His methodological research involves the evaluation and development of advanced statistical methods (e.g., latent trait modelling) in analysing ordinal and correlated outcomes in health sciences.

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of New England Australia
  • Masters (Coursework) of Public Health, University of Sydney
  • Masters (Coursework) of Science, University of Dhaka
  • Bachelor of Science, University of Dhaka

Publications

View all Publications

Grants

View all Grants

Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy

  • Doctor Philosophy

  • Doctor Philosophy

View all Supervision

Available Projects

  • Physical inactivity and sedentariness may be deleterious for health and wellbeing of individuals. Understanding the distribution and determinants (i.e., epidemiology) of physical activity, sedentary behaviour, and their interrelationships can have considerable public health implications in societies where sedentary and inactive lifestyles have become more prevalent. Furthermore, it would be useful to examine whether physical activity can attenuate or even eliminate the detrimental effects of sedentary behaviours on individuals’ health and psychosocial wellbeing. This research will explore patterns of physical activity and sedentary behaviour, links with physical and psychosocial wellbeing, and if activity can offset potentially detrimental effects of prolonged sedentariness.

  • Patient reported outcomes are widely used in health and rehabilitation sciences. These outcomes are often assessed using different rating scales, which result in ordinal outcome data. Although there are demonstrated advantages of Rasch-based modelling, over the classical methods, such modelling has received a little attention in health and medical research in analysing ordinal outcomes. Additional evidence needs to be generated to demonstrate the inferential costs of using classical methods in analysing ordinal outcomes, which in turn can further strengthen the argument for using Rasch-based modelling. This work will also facilitate the development of guidelines for statistical analyses of rating scale ordinal outcomes.

  • Australia is one of the most culturally and linguistically diverse countries in the world. About half (49%) of Australians were born overseas or had one or both parents born overseas. However, there are apparent disparities in health and wellbeing in people with diverse backgrounds. People from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds can face greater challenges when navigating the health-care system, which compromise their equitable access to healthcare services. Language barriers, lower health literacy, and difficulties navigating an unfamiliar system put them at greater risk of poorer quality health care, service delivery and poorer health outcomes compared with other Australians. Understanding patterns of diseases within CALD populations is important to being able to address the health needs of the CALD population. In addition to examining chronic diseases and risk behaviours, this research will explore issues and challenges in accessing health-care services among CALD populations in Australia.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Book Chapter

  • Burton, Nicola W. and Khan, Asaduzzaman (2023). Physical activity as recovery resource for mental health in adults. The importance of recovery for physical and mental health: negotiating the effects of underrecovery. (pp. 172-199) edited by Micheal Kellmann, Sarah Jakowski and Jürgen Beckmann,. London, United Kingdom: Routledge. doi: 10.4324/9781003250647-11

  • Khan, Asaduzzaman and Burton, Nicola W. (2023). Physical activity as recovery resource for mental health in young people. The importance of recovery for physical and mental health: negotiating the effects of underrecovery. (pp. 154-171) edited by Michael Kellmann, Sarah Jakowski and Jürgen Beckmann. London: Routledge. doi: 10.4324/9781003250647-10

Journal Article

Conference Publication

Other Outputs

Grants (Administered at UQ)

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

Completed Supervision

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • Physical inactivity and sedentariness may be deleterious for health and wellbeing of individuals. Understanding the distribution and determinants (i.e., epidemiology) of physical activity, sedentary behaviour, and their interrelationships can have considerable public health implications in societies where sedentary and inactive lifestyles have become more prevalent. Furthermore, it would be useful to examine whether physical activity can attenuate or even eliminate the detrimental effects of sedentary behaviours on individuals’ health and psychosocial wellbeing. This research will explore patterns of physical activity and sedentary behaviour, links with physical and psychosocial wellbeing, and if activity can offset potentially detrimental effects of prolonged sedentariness.

  • Patient reported outcomes are widely used in health and rehabilitation sciences. These outcomes are often assessed using different rating scales, which result in ordinal outcome data. Although there are demonstrated advantages of Rasch-based modelling, over the classical methods, such modelling has received a little attention in health and medical research in analysing ordinal outcomes. Additional evidence needs to be generated to demonstrate the inferential costs of using classical methods in analysing ordinal outcomes, which in turn can further strengthen the argument for using Rasch-based modelling. This work will also facilitate the development of guidelines for statistical analyses of rating scale ordinal outcomes.

  • Australia is one of the most culturally and linguistically diverse countries in the world. About half (49%) of Australians were born overseas or had one or both parents born overseas. However, there are apparent disparities in health and wellbeing in people with diverse backgrounds. People from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds can face greater challenges when navigating the health-care system, which compromise their equitable access to healthcare services. Language barriers, lower health literacy, and difficulties navigating an unfamiliar system put them at greater risk of poorer quality health care, service delivery and poorer health outcomes compared with other Australians. Understanding patterns of diseases within CALD populations is important to being able to address the health needs of the CALD population. In addition to examining chronic diseases and risk behaviours, this research will explore issues and challenges in accessing health-care services among CALD populations in Australia.