Associate Professor David Chapman

Associate Professor

School of Languages and Cultures
Faculty of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences
david.chapman@uq.edu.au
+61 7 336 56390

Overview

David Chapman is Associate Professor and Reader in Japanese Studies at The School of Languages and Cultures, St Lucia campus, UQ. David’s research interests include the cultural and social history of the marginalized in Japanese society, human rights in Japan and Asia, citizenship and national identity in Japan and surveillance and the law in Japan.

Research Interests

  • The marginalised in Japanese society
    I have been privileged to work with many communities in Japan including the Korean Communities, Ogasawara Island descendants of Pacific Islander, European and American settlers, unregistered residents of Japan and Ryukyu Island communities. My interests also extend to social dimensions of gender, socio-economic status, legal status and linguistic background that often overlap with diverse ethnic heritage.
  • Disaster and the Anthropocene in Japan
    My latest work focuses on the Anthropocene in the Japanese context. In particular, I am interested in local culture/tradition and the human connection with the natural world in relation to disaster prevention.
  • Legal/non-legal Status in Japan
    I have researched how people are identified legally, socially and bureaucratically in Japan. In particular, I have a keen interest in the Family Registration system (the koseki 戸籍), Special Permanent Residents (特別永住者), unregistered (無戸籍者) and the Residency Registry (住民票). This research includes historical as well as contemporary contexts.

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, Curtin University of Technology
  • Masters (Coursework) of Applied Linguistics, Macquarie University
  • Bachelor of Education, Deakin University

Publications

  • Wilkinson, Aoife and Chapman, David (2023). Mixed Japanese identities and multiculturalism. Japan Forum, 1-20. doi: 10.1080/09555803.2023.2268089

  • Chapman, David (2022). History and the Bonin (Ogasawara) Islands: connecting Japan and the Pacific. Routledge handbook of race and ethnicity in Asia. (pp. 381-392) edited by Michael Weiner. Abingdon, Oxon, United Kingdom: Routledge. doi: 10.4324/9781351246705-30

  • Chapman, David (2022). Meiji and the Bonin Islands. Revisiting Japan's Restoration. (pp. 109-116) London, United Kingdom: Routledge. doi: 10.4324/9781003207771-17

View all Publications

Supervision

View all Supervision

Available Projects

  • Japan has long been part of the social, cultural, political and historical landscape of Australia; compared with other Asian nations, it occupies a significant part of this space. However, in recent years, countries such as China and South Korea have become more visible, removing Japan from its position as Australia’s leading trading partner in Asia. Although the Japan-Australia relationship has been widely discussed, much less discourse has focused on Japan’s place within Australia and within the nation’s social, cultural and historical landscape. Past discussion has been about earlier enmity and misunderstanding as well as more recent close relations between the two countries. With the changing dynamics of Australia’s relationship with Asia there is a need for a fresh look at Japan within Australia and how Japan has been understood and conceptualized.

  • I have researched extensively how people are identified legally, socially and bureaucratically in Japan. In particular, I have a keen interest in the Family Registration system (the koseki 戸籍), Special Permanent Residents (特別永住者), unregistered (無戸籍者) and the Resdients Registry (住民票). This research includes historical as well as contemporary contexts.

  • I have been privledged to work with many communities in Japan including the Korean Communities, Ogasawara Island descendants of Pacific Islander, European and American settlers, unregistered resdients of Japan and Okinawans. My interests also extend to social dimensions of gender, socio-economic status and linguistic background that often overlap with different ethnic heritage.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Featured Publications

  • Chapman, David (2022). History and the Bonin (Ogasawara) Islands: connecting Japan and the Pacific. Routledge handbook of race and ethnicity in Asia. (pp. 381-392) edited by Michael Weiner. Abingdon, Oxon, United Kingdom: Routledge. doi: 10.4324/9781351246705-30

  • Chapman, David (2022). Meiji and the Bonin Islands. Revisiting Japan's Restoration. (pp. 109-116) London, United Kingdom: Routledge. doi: 10.4324/9781003207771-17

Book

Book Chapter

  • Chapman, David (2022). History and the Bonin (Ogasawara) Islands: connecting Japan and the Pacific. Routledge handbook of race and ethnicity in Asia. (pp. 381-392) edited by Michael Weiner. Abingdon, Oxon, United Kingdom: Routledge. doi: 10.4324/9781351246705-30

  • Chapman, David (2022). Meiji and the Bonin Islands. Revisiting Japan's Restoration. (pp. 109-116) London, United Kingdom: Routledge. doi: 10.4324/9781003207771-17

  • Chapman, David (2020). Gender and the Koseki. The Routledge companion to gender and Japanese culture. (pp. 83-91) edited by Jennifer Coates, Lucy Fraser and Mark Pendleton. London, United Kingdom: Routledge. doi: 10.4324/9781315179582-9

  • Chapman, David and Hayes, Carol (2020). Japan in Australia, an introduction. Japan in Australia: culture, context and connection. (pp. 4-24) edited by David Chapman and Carol Hayes. London, United Kingdom: Routledge. doi: 10.4324/9780429196485-2

  • Chapman, David (2016). Identifying and defining self in a changing Japan. Japan's demographic revival: rethinking migration, identity and sociocultural norms. (pp. 63-80) edited by Stephen Robert Nagy. Singapore: World Scientific Publishers. doi: 10.1142/9789814678889_0004

  • Chapman, David and Krogness, Karl Jakob (2014). The koseki. Japan’s household registration system and citizenship: koseki, identification and documentation. (pp. 1-18) Abingdon, Oxon, United Kingdom: Routledge. doi: 10.4324/9781315889757-1

  • Chapman, David (2014). Managing "strangers" and "undecidables": population registration in Meiji Japan. Japan's household registration system and citizenship: koseki, identification, documentation and citizenship. (pp. 93-110) edited by David Chapman and Karl Jakob Krogness. London, United Kingdom: Routledge. doi: 10.4324/9781315889757

  • Chapman, David and Krogness, Karl Jakob (2014). The koseki. Japan's household registration system and citizenship: koseki, identification, documentation and citizenship. (pp. 1-12) edited by David Chapman and Karl Jakob Krogness. London, United Kingdom: Routledge. doi: 10.4324/9781315889757

  • Chapman, David (2013). Discourses of multicultural coexistence (tabunka kyosei) and the 'old-comer' Korean residents of Japan. Critical Readings on Ethnic Minorities and Multiculturalism in Japan. (pp. 479-498) edited by Richard Siddle. Leiden, Netherlands: Koninklijke Brill.

  • Chapman, David (2013). Korean residents movement in Japan. The Wiley-Blackwell Encyclopedia of Social and Political Movements. (pp. 1-2) edited by David A. Snow and Donatella della Porta. Hoboken NJ United States: John Wiley and Sons. doi: 10.1002/9780470674871.wbespm321

  • Chapman, David (2013). No More 'Aliens': Managing the familiar with the unfamiliar in Japan. Critical readings on ethnic minorities and multiculturalism in Japan. (pp. 813-829) edited by Richard Siddle. Leiden, The Netherlands: Brill.

  • Chapman, David and Long, Daniel (2012). English is my home: citizenship, language and identity in the Ogasawara Islands. Language and Citizenship in Japan. (pp. 175-192) edited by Nanette Gottlieb. New York, NY, USA: Routledge. doi: 10.4324/9780203144442

  • Chapman, David (2012). Identifying the periphery: Challenging citizenship, nationality and identity on the Ogasawara Islands. Living Intersections: Transnational Migrant Identifications in Asia. (pp. 193-211) edited by Caroline Pluss and Kwok-bun Chan. Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Springer Science + Business Media. doi: 10.1007/978-94-007-2966-7_10

  • Weiner, Michael and Chapman, David (2009). Zainichi Koreans in history and memory. Japan's Minorities: The Illusion of Homogeneity. (pp. 162-187) edited by Weiner, Michael. Abingdon, Oxon, UK: Routledge.

  • Chapman, David (2007). Zainichi Korean identity and ethnicity: introduction. Zainichi Korean identity and ethnicity . edited by David Chapman. Abingdon, Oxon, United Kingdom: Routledge.

Journal Article

Conference Publication

Edited Outputs

Grants (Administered at UQ)

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

    Other advisors:

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • Japan has long been part of the social, cultural, political and historical landscape of Australia; compared with other Asian nations, it occupies a significant part of this space. However, in recent years, countries such as China and South Korea have become more visible, removing Japan from its position as Australia’s leading trading partner in Asia. Although the Japan-Australia relationship has been widely discussed, much less discourse has focused on Japan’s place within Australia and within the nation’s social, cultural and historical landscape. Past discussion has been about earlier enmity and misunderstanding as well as more recent close relations between the two countries. With the changing dynamics of Australia’s relationship with Asia there is a need for a fresh look at Japan within Australia and how Japan has been understood and conceptualized.

  • I have researched extensively how people are identified legally, socially and bureaucratically in Japan. In particular, I have a keen interest in the Family Registration system (the koseki 戸籍), Special Permanent Residents (特別永住者), unregistered (無戸籍者) and the Resdients Registry (住民票). This research includes historical as well as contemporary contexts.

  • I have been privledged to work with many communities in Japan including the Korean Communities, Ogasawara Island descendants of Pacific Islander, European and American settlers, unregistered resdients of Japan and Okinawans. My interests also extend to social dimensions of gender, socio-economic status and linguistic background that often overlap with different ethnic heritage.