Dr Benjamin Mos

Senior Lecturer in Aquaculture Biol

School of the Environment
Faculty of Science
b.mos@uq.edu.au
+61 7 334 64588

Overview

Dr Ben Mos obtained his BSc (Hons) in Marine Science and Management from the University of New England, Armidale and his PhD from Southern Cross University, Coffs Harbour. Ben is an Aboriginal man of Turrbal descent. Ben completed a 3-year postdoctoral position at the National Marine Science Centre, Coffs Harbour, refining technologies he developed during his PhD to grow sea urchins as seafood, supporting Australia’s nascent export industry. He was appointed as a lecturer in marine sciences at Southern Cross University in 2019 where Ben worked in the School of Environmental Sciences for 3 years before continuing his academic career at The University of Queensland.

Currently in the School of the Environment, Ben teaches into the Marine Biology major and undertakes research to understand how we (humans) are altering waterways and oceans and impacting the organisms that live there through climate change, pollution, and catching too many fish, and figures out new ways we can solve these problems. Ben is based at Moreton Bay Research Station (MBRS) on beautiful Minjerribah (North Stradbroke Island) where he leads a marine lab with custom seawater systems, located near a unique group of globally important marine and freshwater habitats, ranging from coral reefs, mangroves, and freshwater swamps, and collaborates with First Nations Peoples, industry, government, other researchers, and students from Australia and overseas.

Research Interests

  • Invertebrate Aquaculture
    Developing technologies to supply seafood to a growing global human population
  • Human Impacts in Aquatic Ecosystems
    Understanding how humans are altering oceans and rivers, and figuring out new ways to reduce or reverse the negative impacts on aquatic life
  • Crown-of-thorns Starfish in Present-day and Future Oceans
    Understanding the ecology and biology of a coral-eating sea star, with a particular focus on the crucial larval stage
  • Ecology and Taxonomy of Australian Caridina
    Understanding what freshwater shrimp live in Australia and what they do

Qualifications

  • Bachelor (Honours), NSW.
  • UV - Doctor of Philosophy, The University of Queensland

Publications

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Available Projects

  • Plastic pollution is a common problem in marine ecosystems. Marine animals can mistake plastic for food, which can slow their growth and, in some cases, lead to death. Some animals appear to eat a variety of plastics, but other animals tend to eat one type, colour, or form of plastic. To help understand why and how animals may eat only particular plastics, this project will test whether a marine invertebrate eats different types of plastics at the same rate and whether eating different types of plastic has varying effects on growth, survival, or behaviour.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Featured Publications

Book Chapter

Journal Article

Other Outputs

Grants (Administered at UQ)

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • Plastic pollution is a common problem in marine ecosystems. Marine animals can mistake plastic for food, which can slow their growth and, in some cases, lead to death. Some animals appear to eat a variety of plastics, but other animals tend to eat one type, colour, or form of plastic. To help understand why and how animals may eat only particular plastics, this project will test whether a marine invertebrate eats different types of plastics at the same rate and whether eating different types of plastic has varying effects on growth, survival, or behaviour.