Dr Sabrina Lenzen

Research Fellow

Centre for the Business and Economics of Health
Faculty of Business, Economics and Law
s.lenzen@uq.edu.au
+61 7 344 31320

Overview

I’m a Research Fellow at the Centre for the Business and Economics of Health at The University of Queensland. My expertise is in the economics of health and ageing, with a special focus on dementia and cognitive decline. I’m passionate about improving the lives of older people by studying new health needs in older populations to plan for future healthcare requirements. This research also involves analysing the impact of lifestyle factors on health and wellbeing.

My current research aims to improve knowledge about healthy ageing trends and the likely future health needs of the Australian population. As part of an Australian Research Council grant, I’m investigating trends in the number and percentage of individuals who report health issues in different age groups. In view of an ageing population, I’m studying how these figures change between generations. I’ll use these findings to model health by age group over the next 30 years, which is critical for planning future healthcare capacity.

Prior to my PhD, I worked at McKinsey & Company in the Research & Analytics department of the Healthcare section. During my PhD, I undertook a placement with the Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI) in Dublin, and after my PhD I was an Applied Economist at the Centre for Policy Development in the Sustainable Economy Program.

I hold a Bachelors degree in Health Economics from the University of Cologne, Germany (Dean’s Awards) and a Masters degree in Health Economics from the Erasmus University Rotterdam, the Netherlands (Cum Laude Award). I received my PhD in Health Economics from the University of Queensland where I was awarded the BEL faculty HDR Excellent Award.

Research Interests

  • Dementia
  • Aged care

Research Impacts

My 2020 journal article contributed to the knowledge about modifiable risk factors for dementia. Our analysis showed that being moderately and vigorously physically active at least once a week significantly improves cognitive function in old age. The article received wide-reaching media attention, including a story in the Australian Health Economics Society newsletter and various news and radio outlets (including NewsGP and Yahoo) in Australia, Canada and the United States.

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy of Health Economics, The University of Queensland
  • Masters (Research) of Health Economics, Erasmus University of Rotterdam
  • Bachelor of Health Economics, University of Cologne

Publications

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Supervision

  • Master Philosophy

  • Doctor Philosophy

View all Supervision

Publications

Journal Article

Other Outputs

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision