Associate Professor Simon Reid

Assoc Prof (Global Disease Control)

School of Public Health
Faculty of Medicine
simon.reid@uq.edu.au
+61 7 336 55290

Overview

Simon Reid is an Associate Professor in the School of Public Health at the University of Queensland. He is a keen advocate of One Health and the application of systems thinking approaches to understand and improve interventions for wicked problems at the human-animal-ecosystem interface such as zoonoses. His research includes projects exploring the drivers of human-bat interactions, human brucellosis and improving global health security. He has an emerging interest in multisectoral governance as it applies to high level issues such as health security and antimicrobial resistance. He delivers postgraduate courses in communicable disease control and One Health at UQ.

Qualifications

  • Bachelor of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, Murdoch University
  • Bachelor of Science, Murdoch University
  • Doctor of Philosophy, James Cook University

Publications

View all Publications

Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy

  • Doctor Philosophy

  • Doctor Philosophy

View all Supervision

Available Projects

  • **Note: This project is supported by a top-up scholarship provided by CSIRO. The student will be co-supervised by Dr Yen Pham and Thong Nguyen-Huy from the CSIRO Health and Biosecurity Unit. Prospective students must be domestic applicants or onshore international students who have completed a program at UQ in 2023. Applicants must be onshore at the time that offers are issued.**

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and climate change are both ‘wicked’ problems spanning multiple sectors, requiring systematic approaches to address. Drivers of AMR are complex as they arise from and interact between the human, animal and environmental systems in dynamic and non-linear dimensions. A changing climate is likely exacerbating AMR and its drivers.

    This project will investigate the interrelationships and feedback between climatic factors and the increased growth and spread of bacterial resistance in an integrated model where other non-climatic factors will also be considered. The project will examine how these complex interactions impact AMR in the future under different climate scenarios and propose plausible interventions/management strategies.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Book Chapter

  • Reid, Simon and Kama, Mike (2015). Leptospirosis: a one health case study. One health: the theory and practice of integrated health approaches. (pp. 190-200) edited by Jakob Zinsstag, Esther Schelling, David Waltner-Toews, Maxine Whittaker and Marcel Tanner. Oxford, United Kingdom: CABI.

Journal Article

Conference Publication

Other Outputs

  • Batikawai, Suliasi Mekerusa, Reid, Simon and Osborne, Nicholas (2022). Acute Watery Diarrhea Data for Western and Central Division, Fiji. 2016 - 2021. The University of Queensland. (Dataset) doi: 10.48610/0c2658f

  • Anderson, Amy, Hall, Nina, Henry, Chris, Savage, Amy and Reid, Simon (2019) Water, sanitation and hygiene in the Pacific, and the need to meet SDG 6 Brisbane, Australia: Global Change Institute, The University of Queensland

  • Hall, N., Barbosa, M. C., Currie, D., Dean, A.J., Head, B., Hill, P. S., Naylor, S., Reid, S., Selvey, L. and Willis, J. (2017). Water, sanitation and hygiene in remote Indigenous Australian communities: a scan of priorities. Global Change Institute discussion paper: water for equity and wellbeing series. 2207-9602. Global Change Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane.

  • Hall, Nina , Abal, Eva, Albert, Simon , Ali, Saleem , Barrington, Dani , Dean, Angela , Head, Brian, Hill, Peter, Hussey, Karen , Jagals, Paul , Muriuki, Grace , Pascoe, Mark , Reid, Simon , Richards, Russell, Robinson, Jacqueline, Ross, Helen , Shannon, Cindy , Torero Cullen, Jose and Willis, Jon (2016). The UN Sustainable Development Goals for water and sanitation: how should Australia respond within and beyond its borders?. Global Change Institute discussion paper: water for equity and wellbeing series. 2207-9602. Global Change Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane.

  • Hall, N., Richards, R., Barrington, D., Ross, H., Reid, S., Head, B., Jagals, P., Dean, A., Hussey, K., Abal, E., Ali, S., Boully, L. and Willis, J. (2016). Achieving the UN Sustainable Development Goals for water and beyond. Global Change Institute Discussion Paper: Water for Equity and Wellbeing Series. 2207-9602. Global Change Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane.

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

Completed Supervision

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • **Note: This project is supported by a top-up scholarship provided by CSIRO. The student will be co-supervised by Dr Yen Pham and Thong Nguyen-Huy from the CSIRO Health and Biosecurity Unit. Prospective students must be domestic applicants or onshore international students who have completed a program at UQ in 2023. Applicants must be onshore at the time that offers are issued.**

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and climate change are both ‘wicked’ problems spanning multiple sectors, requiring systematic approaches to address. Drivers of AMR are complex as they arise from and interact between the human, animal and environmental systems in dynamic and non-linear dimensions. A changing climate is likely exacerbating AMR and its drivers.

    This project will investigate the interrelationships and feedback between climatic factors and the increased growth and spread of bacterial resistance in an integrated model where other non-climatic factors will also be considered. The project will examine how these complex interactions impact AMR in the future under different climate scenarios and propose plausible interventions/management strategies.