Dr Peter Crisp

UQ Amplify Researcher

School of Agriculture and Food Sustainability
Faculty of Science
p.crisp@uq.edu.au
+61 7 336 52141

Overview

Dr Peter Crisp is an expert in crop genomics, epigenomics and molecular genetics. He leads a research group in the School of Agriculture and Food Science. His research group seeks to understand the contribution of epigenetics to heritable phenotypic variation in crop plants, focusing on cereals including barley, sorghum, wheat and maize. This includes the development of methods to harness epigenetic variation for crop improvement; understanding the role of epigenetics in stress responses and using innovative epigenomic approaches to distill large genomes down to the relatively small fraction of regions that are functionally important for trait variation. Research in the Crisp Lab spans both wet lab and computational biology providing a powerful platform to integrate genetic, genomic and biotechnological approaches.

Check out the CrispLab website here

Follow Dr Crisp on Twitter: @pete_crisp

Research Impacts

Read about Dr Crisp’s work on plant stress memory and epigenetics in New Scientist here

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, Australian National University

Publications

View all Publications

Grants

View all Grants

Supervision

  • (2024) Doctor Philosophy

  • Doctor Philosophy

  • Doctor Philosophy

View all Supervision

Available Projects

  • New bioinformatic approaches for epigenomic analysis and epiGWAS in crops

    A bioinformatics oriented RHD project is available to study epigenomic variation and inheritance in crops including maize, sorghum and barley. This project will involve the development of new bioinformatic strategies to analyse novel types of epigenomic data we have developed in the lab. This project will address fundamental questions at the core of the field of epigenetics; and will have outcomes that are important for modern plant breeding and agriculture. The project can be largely bioinformatics or encompass a blend of wet lab (biotech and molecular biology) and computational work. Some prior bioinformatics experience is an advantage, although not essential if you are enthusiastic about learning bioinformatics.

  • Projects can also be designed on new topics where our interests overlap and are happy to chat.

    • We are particularly interested in new projects in the areas of (epi)genomics and bioinformatics

    Other areas include:

    • Crop genomics and epigenomics
    • Biotechnology and CRISPR (sorghum and barley)
    • Bioinformatics focused on epigenomic analysis and DNA methylation
    • Enhancers and chromatin modifications

View all Available Projects

Publications

Book Chapter

  • Noshay, Jaclyn M., Crisp, Peter A. and Springer, Nathan M. (2018). The maize methylome. The Maize Genome. (pp. 81-96) edited by Jeffrey Bennetzen, Sherry Flint-Garcia, Candice Hirsch and Roberto Tuberosa. Cham, Switzerland: Springer. doi: 10.1007/978-3-319-97427-9_6

  • Bainbridge, Katherine, Bennett, Tom, Crisp, Peter, Leyser, Ottoline and Turnbull, Colin (2014). Grafting in Arabidopsis. Arabidopsis Protocols. (pp. 155-163) edited by SanchezSerrano, JJ and Salinas, J. New York, NY, United States: Humana Press. doi: 10.1007/978-1-62703-580-4_7

Journal Article

Other Outputs

Grants (Administered at UQ)

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

Completed Supervision

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • New bioinformatic approaches for epigenomic analysis and epiGWAS in crops

    A bioinformatics oriented RHD project is available to study epigenomic variation and inheritance in crops including maize, sorghum and barley. This project will involve the development of new bioinformatic strategies to analyse novel types of epigenomic data we have developed in the lab. This project will address fundamental questions at the core of the field of epigenetics; and will have outcomes that are important for modern plant breeding and agriculture. The project can be largely bioinformatics or encompass a blend of wet lab (biotech and molecular biology) and computational work. Some prior bioinformatics experience is an advantage, although not essential if you are enthusiastic about learning bioinformatics.

  • Projects can also be designed on new topics where our interests overlap and are happy to chat.

    • We are particularly interested in new projects in the areas of (epi)genomics and bioinformatics

    Other areas include:

    • Crop genomics and epigenomics
    • Biotechnology and CRISPR (sorghum and barley)
    • Bioinformatics focused on epigenomic analysis and DNA methylation
    • Enhancers and chromatin modifications