Dr James Hereward

Research Fellow

School of the Environment
Faculty of Science

Overview

My research applies population genetics, evolutionary and ecological theory, and genomics to understand agricultural pests, weeds and pollination, all three are billion dollar problems facing Australian Agriculture. I am always keen to explore new approaches and cutting-edge technologies. This is important because some of the most innovative and transformative advances in genomics are coming from human genomics, and I draw upon these advances and apply them to insect and weed pests. As a result, my research combines cutting-edge genomic tools and ecological experimentation to investigate agricultural pests in an evolutionary context, with the goal of protecting agricultural crops and ensuring global food security.

Research Impacts

In addition to peer reviewed outputs, I communicate my research to stakeholders through industry communication channels and my work feeds into management plans for agricultural industries to reduce the impact of pests and weeds. I have also published a number of articles in the conversation on the ethical issues of various aspects of DNA technology.

Recently gave a media comment to Nature News about changes to the OGTR regulations on genome editing technology exempting CRISPR from GMO regulation provided no new genetic material is added. https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-01282-8

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, The University of Queensland
  • Bachelor of Science, The University of Manchester

Publications

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Supervision

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Available Projects

  • Phorid flies are a devastating pest of Australian native stingless bees, but very little is known about their basic biology and what attracts them to a hive. Short or long projects can be designed using a combination of ecology / genetics / and behavioral/bioassay studies. Collaboration with Dr Tobias Smith at the UQ Stingless Bee Lab

  • Projects are available to use high-throughput DNA sequencing methods to investiagate pollination of native stingless bees

  • Phd project available to investigate stingless bees (Tetragonula spp.) as effective pollinators of tropical fruits in northern Australia. Opportunities to apply for industry scholarship top-up and operating expenses. This project will involve a combination of behavioural and molecular ecology and plant phenology to determine the effectiveness of managed native pollinators and will develop a pollination strategy for industry. Will involve fieldwork in the Northern Territory. Collaboration with Mary Finlay-Doney (Northern Territory DITT).

View all Available Projects

Publications

Featured Publications

Journal Article

Other Outputs

Grants (Administered at UQ)

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

Completed Supervision

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • Phorid flies are a devastating pest of Australian native stingless bees, but very little is known about their basic biology and what attracts them to a hive. Short or long projects can be designed using a combination of ecology / genetics / and behavioral/bioassay studies. Collaboration with Dr Tobias Smith at the UQ Stingless Bee Lab

  • Projects are available to use high-throughput DNA sequencing methods to investiagate pollination of native stingless bees

  • Phd project available to investigate stingless bees (Tetragonula spp.) as effective pollinators of tropical fruits in northern Australia. Opportunities to apply for industry scholarship top-up and operating expenses. This project will involve a combination of behavioural and molecular ecology and plant phenology to determine the effectiveness of managed native pollinators and will develop a pollination strategy for industry. Will involve fieldwork in the Northern Territory. Collaboration with Mary Finlay-Doney (Northern Territory DITT).

  • Phd project available integrating population genetics, ecological genetics (DNA diet analyses), and mathematical models to understand the movement and host plant relationships of Rutherglen bug. We are interested in these things specifically in relation to pest dynamics, forecasting, and precision digital IPM. Opportunities to apply for industry funding and work alongside a GRDC supported team, includes opportunities for mentoring from myself and Dr Hazel Parry (CSIRO), Dr Dean Brookes (UQ), Dr Zorica Duric (NSW DPI), and Dr Matt Hill (Data61, CSIRO).